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The optimal cleansing method for the removal of sunscreen:Water, cleanser or cleansing oil?
J Cosmet Dermatol. 2020 Jan; 19(1):180-184.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the cleaning efficacy of sunscreen with or without water-resistant performance by water, or a foaming cleanser or a cleansing oil.

METHODS

Photos of 20 participants were taken by VISIA prior and subsequent to application of the sunscreen as a negative control and a positive control, respectively. Volunteers were instructed to wash off sunscreen with water only, the cleanser or the cleansing oil and photos were taken by VISIA again after face washing. Assessment of the cleansing efficacy was conducted by Photoshop CS6 and volunteer-reported outcomes.

RESULTS

For the non-waterproof sunscreen, the residue rate of water, cleanser, and cleansing oil group were 54.0% ± 19.2%, 15.6% ± 6.1%, 13.4% ± 4.6%, respectively. No significant difference was found between the cleanser group and the negative control group (9.9% ± 4.8%) or between the cleansing oil group and the negative control group. For the waterproof sunscreen, the residue rate of water, cleanser, and cleansing oil group were 59.3% ± 10.4%, 36.8% ± 8.8%, 5.8% ± 3.3%, respectively. No significant difference was found between cleansing oil group and the negative control group (3.2% ± 2.2%). For adverse events, eight participants in cleanser group and one participant in cleansing oil group reported dry skin after face washing.

CONCLUSION

The non-waterproof sunscreen may be washed off by the cleanser or cleansing oil and the waterproof sunscreen by the cleansing oil. Moreover, the cleansing oil may cause less skin irritation and dryness compared with the cleanser. Future studies are needed to investigate other types of sunscreens and washing products.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatovenereology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China. Department of Medical Cosmetology, The Second People's Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu, China.Department of Medical Cosmetology, The Second People's Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu, China.Department of Dermatovenereology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.Department of Dermatovenereology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31157512

Citation

Chen, Wei, et al. "The Optimal Cleansing Method for the Removal of sunscreen:Water, Cleanser or Cleansing Oil?" Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, vol. 19, no. 1, 2020, pp. 180-184.
Chen W, He M, Xie L, et al. The optimal cleansing method for the removal of sunscreen:Water, cleanser or cleansing oil? J Cosmet Dermatol. 2020;19(1):180-184.
Chen, W., He, M., Xie, L., & Li, L. (2020). The optimal cleansing method for the removal of sunscreen:Water, cleanser or cleansing oil? Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, 19(1), 180-184. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12995
Chen W, et al. The Optimal Cleansing Method for the Removal of sunscreen:Water, Cleanser or Cleansing Oil. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2020;19(1):180-184. PubMed PMID: 31157512.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The optimal cleansing method for the removal of sunscreen:Water, cleanser or cleansing oil? AU - Chen,Wei, AU - He,Mei, AU - Xie,Li, AU - Li,Li, Y1 - 2019/06/03/ PY - 2018/05/19/received PY - 2019/03/28/revised PY - 2019/04/22/accepted PY - 2019/6/4/pubmed PY - 2020/11/20/medline PY - 2019/6/4/entrez KW - cleanser KW - cleansing oil KW - skin barrier KW - sunscreens KW - ultraviolet SP - 180 EP - 184 JF - Journal of cosmetic dermatology JO - J Cosmet Dermatol VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cleaning efficacy of sunscreen with or without water-resistant performance by water, or a foaming cleanser or a cleansing oil. METHODS: Photos of 20 participants were taken by VISIA prior and subsequent to application of the sunscreen as a negative control and a positive control, respectively. Volunteers were instructed to wash off sunscreen with water only, the cleanser or the cleansing oil and photos were taken by VISIA again after face washing. Assessment of the cleansing efficacy was conducted by Photoshop CS6 and volunteer-reported outcomes. RESULTS: For the non-waterproof sunscreen, the residue rate of water, cleanser, and cleansing oil group were 54.0% ± 19.2%, 15.6% ± 6.1%, 13.4% ± 4.6%, respectively. No significant difference was found between the cleanser group and the negative control group (9.9% ± 4.8%) or between the cleansing oil group and the negative control group. For the waterproof sunscreen, the residue rate of water, cleanser, and cleansing oil group were 59.3% ± 10.4%, 36.8% ± 8.8%, 5.8% ± 3.3%, respectively. No significant difference was found between cleansing oil group and the negative control group (3.2% ± 2.2%). For adverse events, eight participants in cleanser group and one participant in cleansing oil group reported dry skin after face washing. CONCLUSION: The non-waterproof sunscreen may be washed off by the cleanser or cleansing oil and the waterproof sunscreen by the cleansing oil. Moreover, the cleansing oil may cause less skin irritation and dryness compared with the cleanser. Future studies are needed to investigate other types of sunscreens and washing products. SN - 1473-2165 UR - https://cancerres.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31157512/The_optimal_cleansing_method_for_the_removal_of_sunscreen:Water_cleanser_or_cleansing_oil DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -